Early Mistakes Lead to High Scores

In Golf Club Buying Guide by SirShanksAlotLeave a Comment

Hey everyone and thanks for stopping by. I thought I’d shift gears a bit tonight and post something in our “Golf Club Buying Guide” section. Every spring golfers flock to shops like ours set on making this the year that they shoot the lights out.ImageThey’ve done their homework over the winter and have all sorts of preconceived ideas as to what combination of equipment will yield the best results. I thought we’d take a look at some of the common mistakes I see customers make when shopping for equipment at the start of the season.

Don’t make your buying decisions based on the first few swings of the year…

I know this one sounds really basic but it’s amazing how many people buy clubs before hitting the range for the first time. People have to remember that they’re buying clubs that will perform during the most important shots of the year… not clubs that will fit their worst swings of the season. Go knock off the rust with a few trips to the driving range and then look at new clubs. Look back on last season and think about what kind of shots you were hitting. These shots will eventually find their way back into your arsenal unless you took a bunch of lessons in the off season. I see a lot of low hooks early in the year and some golfers figure that their slice somehow disappeared over the winter. Don’t fool yourself… if you sliced all of last year, you’ll probably slice this year too. Buy accordingly!

Add a few MPH to your early season swing speed…

Kind of a basic one but an important one to remember. We measure a lot of swing speeds at the start of the year as people look to fine tune their new purchases. It’s important not to underestimate your swing if you are buying early in the year. Focus less on the swing speed reading that you get early in the year and think more long term. I find most people will swing 5-8 MPH faster as the season rolls on. If you’re on the “swing speed fence” and have to choose between shaft flexes… it’s something to keep in mind.

Don’t commit to a golf ball right off the bat…

Choosing the right golf ball is vital and it’s a decision that doesn’t have to be made before you step onto the tee for the first round of the year. Buy a few different sleeves and take them out to test before deciding on your ball for the year. Find one that works well and stick with it… your swing will probably never be consistent but at least your golf ball will be…

Buy now and fit later…

Unless you spent your winter golfing, you’re probably best to use your new clubs before getting them fit. It’s not a huge deal to change lie or length down the road. Focus on shaft flex and grip size when initially purchasing clubs, go use them for a while and then look at getting them fit. Fitting someone early in the season is a fun time… we can fit one swing but it can get a bit tricky when you throw three or four different ones at us! Most shops have no problem fitting down the road… just remember to hang onto your receipt.

Sometimes the best purchase is the one you don’t make…

I know that the equipment companies don’t want to hear this but it’s true. If everything was working well last year then you’re probably best to stick with it for a while. The start of a new season doesn’t mean you have to buy new gear. New clubs will still be there over the summer if you really get the urge to change it up. You might find that some new grips and spikes are an inexpensive alternative to dropping the big bucks.

Think of the course before buying the equipment…

Play the same course all the time? Have you ever stopped and looked at your bag to see if it matches the types of shots you see on a regular basis? If you play a really long course… load up on hybrids and/or fairway woods. Is your home course shorter? Lose a few long irons and add some wedges. Take notice of your turf and sand conditions… these are important when selecting the proper bounce on your wedges. Find a putter that suits the speed of your greens. Invest in a light stand bag if your course is hilly and you want to walk. Make sure you have the right tools. Everyone is all about distance at the start of the year but they often don’t realize that the little things will probably make more of a difference. An important tip if you’re moving to a new course this year!

A few things to think about before heading out to your local shop this weekend. Thanks for all of the emails and support. Stay tuned… more reviews are on the way! Talk to you later.

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